59% Approve of Supreme Court Performance, 25% Disapprove

Fifty-nine percent (59%) of voters approve of the way the U.S. Supreme Court is performing its job. A Scott Rasmussen national survey found that 25% disapprove and 16% are not sure.

Those totals include 17% who Strongly Approve and 7% who Strongly Disapprove.

These figures are consistent with many years of polling data. The Supreme Court is consistently viewed more favorably than any other branch of government.

Approval comes from 65% of Democrats and 61% of Republicans.

As on many topics, independent voters are less engaged: 40% approve and another 40% are not sure.

Sixty-three percent (63%) of Hispanic voters approve along with 62% of Black voters and 59% of White voters.

Voters who prefer the policies of former President Donald Trump or Senator Bernie Sanders offer modestly lower opinions of the Court performance than those who prefer traditional Republican or Democratic policies.

SIGN UP to receive Scott’s free email newsletter.

CHECK OUT Scott’s latest polls.

Note: Neither Scott Rasmussen, ScottRasmussen.com, nor RMG Research, Inc. have any affiliation with Rasmussen Reports. While Scott Rasmussen founded that firm, he left more than seven years ago and has had no involvement since that time.

Methodology

The online survey of 1,000 Registered Voters was conducted by Scott Rasmussen on June 29-30, 2021. Field work for the survey was conducted by RMG Research, Inc.   Certain quotas were applied, and the sample was lightly weighted by geography, gender, age, race, education, internet usage, and political party to reasonably reflect the nation’s population of Registered Voters. Other variables were reviewed to ensure that the final sample is representative of that population.

Posted in Poll Results | Tagged ,

Scott's Newsletter
Sign up for Scott's newsletter and get his political insight delivered right to your inbox!

30% See Obamacare as Top Issue Before Supreme Court; 17% Say Abortion

Thirty percent (30%) of voters nationwide say Obamacare is the top issue before the Supreme Court at this time. A Scott Rasmussen national survey found that 17% named abortion as the top issue while 13% said 2nd Amendment issues. Additionally, 9% see issues surrounding the Administrative State as most important while 8% say Religious Liberty.

Seventeen percent (17%) say some other issue was tops and 6% are not sure.

Abortion is viewed as most important by 20% of Republicans and 18% of Democrats. When viewing results by party, that’s the only common ground. Among Independent voters, 13% see abortion as the top issue before the Court.

Among Democrats, 46% see Obamacare as the top issue. Just 26% of Independents agree along with 15% of Republicans.

For GOP voters, 2nd Amendment issues and Abortion top the list.

While Supreme Court issues are seen as important, there is often a misunderstanding about the issues themselves. Polling released earlier showed that most voters don’t know what would happen if Roe v. Wade is overturned.

LISTEN TO Scott’s Podcast.

SIGN UP to receive Scott’s free email newsletter.

CHECK OUT Scott’s latest polls.

Note: Neither Scott Rasmussen, ScottRasmussen.com, nor RMG Research, Inc. have any affiliation with Rasmussen Reports. While Scott Rasmussen founded that firm, he left more than seven years ago and has had no involvement since that time.

Methodology

The survey of 1,200 Registered Voters was conducted by Scott Rasmussen using a mixed mode approach from October 1-3, 2020. Field work for the survey was conducted by RMG Research, Inc. Most respondents were contacted online or via text while 121 were contacted using automated phone polling techniques. Certain quotas were applied to the overall sample and lightly weighted by geography, gender, age, race, education, and political party to reasonably reflect the nation’s population of Registered Voters. Other variables were reviewed to ensure that the final sample is representative of that population.

56% Don’t Know What Overturning Roe v. Wade Would Mean

Most Registered Voters (56%) don’t know what would happen if the U.S. Supreme Court overturned the Roe v. Wade ruling. A Scott Rasmussen national survey found that total includes 30% who mistakenly believe that abortion would be outlawed in the United States and 26% who are simply not sure.

Forty-four percent (44%) recognize that overturning Roe v. Wade would allow every state to establish its own laws governing abortion.

Misunderstanding on the issue is found all across the political spectrum. It is found among 57% of Independent voters, 56% of Democrats, and 54% of Republicans.

One of the great challenges in 21st century politics is recognizing that terms used in the political dialogue often are not perceived in the same way by voters.

 

LISTEN TO Scott’s Podcast.

SIGN UP to receive Scott’s free email newsletter.

CHECK OUT Scott’s latest polls.

Note: Neither Scott Rasmussen, ScottRasmussen.com, nor RMG Research, Inc. have any affiliation with Rasmussen Reports. While Scott Rasmussen founded that firm, he left more than seven years ago and has had no involvement since that time.

Methodology

The survey of 1,000 Registered Voters was conducted online by Scott Rasmussen September 26, 2020. Field work for the survey was conducted by RMG Research, Inc.  Certain quotas were applied to the overall sample and lightly weighted by geography, gender, age, race, education, and political party to reasonably reflect the nation’s population of Registered Voters. Other variables were reviewed to ensure that the final sample is representative of that population.

 

 

Posted in Poll Results | Tagged ,

Scott's Newsletter
Sign up for Scott's newsletter and get his political insight delivered right to your inbox!

34% Recognize Sandra Day O’Connor As First Woman on Supreme Court

Given a list of four politically prominent women, 34% recognize that Sandra Day O’Connor was the first woman to serve on the United States Supreme Court. A Scott Rasmussen national survey found that 36% mistakenly believe that Ruth Bader Ginsburg was the first woman on the Court. Three percent (3%) believe that honor was earned by current Justice Sonia Sotomayor and 3% named Margaret Chase Smith. Smith never served on the Supreme Court, but was the first woman to serve in both the House of Representatives and the United States Senate.

Even when presented with a list of names, 23% were not able to identify the name of the first female Supreme Court Justice.

Among voters 55 and older, a plurality– but not a majority– correctly identified O’Connor. A plurality of younger voters thought it was Ginsuburg. A poll conducted the day after Ginsburg’s passing showed that she was viewed favorably by 64% of voters.

Thirty-one percent (31%) of voters identified Ronald Reagan as the first president to appoint a woman to the Court. A slightly larger number–35%– did not know.

LISTEN TO Scott’s Podcast.

SIGN UP to receive Scott’s free email newsletter.

CHECK OUT Scott’s latest polls.

Note: Neither Scott Rasmussen, ScottRasmussen.com, nor RMG Research, Inc. have any affiliation with Rasmussen Reports. While Scott Rasmussen founded that firm, he left more than seven years ago and has had no involvement since that time.

Methodology

The survey of 1,000 Registered Voters was conducted online by Scott Rasmussen September 26, 2020. Field work for the survey was conducted by RMG Research, Inc.  Certain quotas were applied to the overall sample and lightly weighted by geography, gender, age, race, education, and political party to reasonably reflect the nation’s population of Registered Voters. Other variables were reviewed to ensure that the final sample is representative of that population.

Posted in Poll Results | Tagged

Scott's Newsletter
Sign up for Scott's newsletter and get his political insight delivered right to your inbox!

53% Rate Supreme Court Good or Excellent; 8% Say Poor

Fifty-three percent (53%) of voters nationwide rate the performance of the U.S. Supreme Court as Good or Excellent. A Scott Rasmussen national survey found that just 8% say poor. In between are 32% who say the Court’s performance has been just fair.

Support is found in all segments of the nation. Sixty-one percent (61%) of Republicans give the Court positive reviews as do 54% of Democrats. Among other voters, 43% share that view.

Fifty-five percent (55%) of the most conservative voters give thumbs up for the Court. So do 57% of the most liberal voters.

Ideologically, 33% believe the Court’s balance is about right while 30% say too conservative and 20% too liberal.

In its treatment of protestors who commit violent acts, 44% believe the courts and legal system have been too lenient while 18% say too harsh.

Results for the full sample have a Margin of Error of +/- 3.4 percentage points.

LISTEN TO Scott’s Podcast.

SIGN UP to receive Scott’s free email newsletter.

CHECK OUT Scott’s latest polls.

Methodology

The survey of 854 Likely Voters was conducted online by Scott Rasmussen September 19, 2020. Field work for the survey was conducted by RMG Research, Inc. These voters were selected from a larger sample of 1,100 Registered Voters. Likely Voters were defined as those who say they are “Definitely going to vote” or “Very Likely to Vote” and who know how they will vote.  Certain quotas were applied to the overall sample and lightly weighted by geography, gender, age, race, education, and political party to reasonably reflect the nation’s population of Registered Voters. Other variables were reviewed to ensure that the final sample is representative of that population.

Posted in Poll Results | Tagged ,

Scott's Newsletter
Sign up for Scott's newsletter and get his political insight delivered right to your inbox!

64% Have Favorable Opinion of Ruth Bader Ginsburg

In a survey conducted the day after her passing, 64% of Likely Voters said they had a favorable opinion of Ruth Bader Ginsburg. The Scott Rasmussen survey found just 16% with an unfavorable view while 20% are not sure.

These results are broadly consistent with earlier surveys in recent years. Justice Ginsburg was the most recognized name of all Supreme Court Justices, often the only name recognized by more than half the nation’s voters.

The survey also found that 52% of Likely Voters believe the Senate should wait to confirm Ginsburg’s replacement until after the presidential election. Forty-one percent (41%) disagree and believe the new Justice should be confirmed as soon as possible. Not surprisingly, there is a substantial partisan divide on this question.

  • Seventy-three percent (73%) of Republicans believe the new Justice should be confirmed as soon as possible.
  • Eighty percent (80%) of Democrats believe confirmation should wait until after the election.
  • Independent voters were more evenly divided. Fifty-one percent (51%) agree with the Democrats and 40% with the Republicans.

Additionally, 59% of the nation’s Likely Voters believe Joe Biden should let voters know who he would nominate if elected. Just 21% disagree while 20% are not sure.

The partisan divide on this is interesting. The Trump campaign has been pushing Biden to release a list of potential nominees. However, Democratic voters are even more likely than Republican voters to think he should do so. Sixty-six percent (66%) of Democrats want their party’s nominee to announce who he would nominate for the Court. That view is shared by 57% of Independent voters and 52% of Republicans.

Other data from the survey shows that 53% of voters rate the Supreme Court’s performance as good or excellent.

Results for the full sample have a Margin of Error of +/- 3.4 percentage points.

LISTEN TO Scott’s Podcast.

SIGN UP to receive Scott’s free email newsletter.

CHECK OUT Scott’s latest polls.

Methodology

The survey of 854 Likely Voters was conducted online by Scott Rasmussen September 19, 2020. Field work for the survey was conducted by RMG Research, Inc. These voters were selected from a larger sample of 1,100 Registered Voters. Likely Voters were defined as those who say they are “Definitely going to vote” or “Very Likely to Vote” and who know how they will vote.  Certain quotas were applied to the overall sample and lightly weighted by geography, gender, age, race, education, and political party to reasonably reflect the nation’s population of Registered Voters. Other variables were reviewed to ensure that the final sample is representative of that population.

Posted in Poll Results | Tagged ,

Scott's Newsletter
Sign up for Scott's newsletter and get his political insight delivered right to your inbox!

Supreme Court Approval Rating at 52%

Fifty-two percent (52%) of voters nationwide approve of the way the Supreme Court is performing its role. A Ballotpedia survey found that 31% disapprove and 17% are not sure.

The survey also found that a narrow plurality (30%) believe the Court’s ideological balance is about right. However, 28% believe it is too conservative and 19% believe it is too liberal.

Sixty-two percent (62%) of Hispanic voters approve of the Court’s performance as do 53% of White voters. However, just 39% of Black voters share that assessment. Among Black voters, 44% disapprove.

A plurality of Republicans believe the Court is too liberal while a plurality of Democrats believe it is too conservative. Seven-out-of-ten Independent voters believe either that the balance is about right (30%) or are not sure (40%).

Data released yesterday showed that 47% of voters see Supreme Court nominations as a Very Important voting issue.

LISTEN TO Scott’s Daily Podcast, “Scott Rasmussen’s Number of the Day.”

 SIGN UP to receive Scott’s free email newsletter.

CHECK OUT Scott’s latest polls.

FOLLOW Scott on Twitter.

Methodology

The online survey of 1,000 Registered Voters was conducted by Scott Rasmussen on June 20, 2020. Field work for the survey was conducted by RMG Research, Inc.  Certain quotas were applied to the overall sample and lightly weighted by geography, gender, age, race, education, and political party to reasonably reflect the nation’s population of Registered Voters. Other variables were reviewed to ensure that the final sample is representative of that population.

Posted in Poll Results | Tagged ,

Scott's Newsletter
Sign up for Scott's newsletter and get his political insight delivered right to your inbox!

47% Say Supreme Court Nominations Are Very Important Voting Issue

Forty-seven percent (47%) of voters nationwide say that Supreme Court nominations will be a Very Important voting issue in terms of deciding their vote for President. A Scott Rasmussen national survey found that total includes 56% of Democrats, 48% of Republicans, and 35% of those not affiliated with either major party.

Still, despite the significance of the Supreme Court, five other issues were seen as Very Important by a larger number of voters. Seventy-three percent (73%) consider health care to be a Very Important voting issue while 67% say the same about the economy. Close behind, 64% say Civil Rights issues are Very Important while an identical number say Law and Order is that important. Immigration is seen as Very Important by 53% of voters.

On most of the issues, there is little difference between the views of those who are out working and those who are not interacting with customers or co-workers. However, there is a substantial divide on the issue of law and order. Among those workers who regularly interact with both customers and co-workers, 78% say Law and Order is a Very Important Issue. Among those who are not interacting with others, just 49% hold that view.

Methodology

The online survey of 1,000 Registered Voters was conducted by Scott Rasmussen on June 20, 2020. Field work for the survey was conducted by RMG Research, Inc.  Certain quotas were applied to the overall sample and lightly weighted by geography, gender, age, race, education, and political party to reasonably reflect the nation’s population of Registered Voters. Other variables were reviewed to ensure that the final sample is representative of that population.

Posted in Poll Results | Tagged ,

Scott's Newsletter
Sign up for Scott's newsletter and get his political insight delivered right to your inbox!