66% Worried That Elected Officials Want to Keep Pandemic Powers Over Individual Americans

During the pandemic, government officials exercised extraordinary power over the lives of individual Americans. A Scott Rasmussen national survey found that 66% of voters are worried that many government officials will try to continue exercising such power over individual Americans.

That number is up slightly from 62% in June.

Twenty-five percent (25%) of voters are not worried and 8% are not sure.

The current totals include 35% who are Very Worried and 9% who are Not at All Worried.

Eighty-five percent (85%) of Republicans are worried about elected officials clinging to pandemic power. So are 60% of Independents and 57% of Democrats.

These results are generally consistent with earlier data showing that 65% of voters believe the federal government is actively working to get more power and control over the lives of everyday Americans.

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Note: Neither Scott Rasmussen, ScottRasmussen.com, nor RMG Research, Inc. have any affiliation with Rasmussen Reports. While Scott Rasmussen founded that firm, he left more than seven years ago and has had no involvement since that time.

Question:

During the pandemic, government officials exercised extraordinary power over the lives of individual Americans. How worried are you that many government officials will try to continue exercising such power over individual Americans?

35%    Very worried

31%    Somewhat worried

16%    Not very worried

9%    Not at all worried

8%    Not sure

Methodology

The survey of 1,200 Registered Voters was conducted online by Scott Rasmussen on December 1-3, 2021. Field work for the survey was conducted by RMG Research, Inc. Certain quotas were applied, and the sample was lightly weighted by geography, gender, age, race, education, internet usage, and political party to reasonably reflect the nation’s population of Registered Voters. Other variables were reviewed to ensure that the final sample is representative of that population.