70% Believe America Founded on Noble Ideals of Freedom, Equality, and Self-Governance

Seventy percent (70%) of voters believe that America was founded on the noble ideals of freedom, equality, and self-governance. They recognize our nation has a tragic history of racial injustice, but believe we have made and continue to make progress.

A Scott Rasmussen national survey found that 17% disagree and believe the nation was founded upon the ideas of racial oppression and white supremacy. They want us to reject the system of government created by the founders of our nation.

Eighty-one percent (81%) of Republicans believe our nation was founded upon noble ideals. So do 64% of Independent voters and 61% of Democrats. That positive view is shared by 76% of White voters, 62% of Hispanic voters and 48% of Black voters.

While Americans overwhelmingly believe that America was founded upon noble ideals, just 51% believe that is how history is being taught in school these days. Eighteen percent (18%) believe students are being taught that our nation was founded upon the views of racial oppression and white supremacy.

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Note: Neither Scott Rasmussen, ScottRasmussen.com, nor RMG Research, Inc. have any affiliation with Rasmussen Reports. While Scott Rasmussen founded that firm, he left more than seven years ago and has had no involvement since that time.

Methodology

The survey of 1,000 Registered Voters was conducted online by Scott Rasmussen on October 9-10, 2021. Field work for the survey was conducted by RMG Research, Inc. Certain quotas were applied, and the sample was lightly weighted by geography, gender, age, race, education, internet usage, and political party to reasonably reflect the nation’s population of Registered Voters. Other variables were reviewed to ensure that the final sample is representative of that population.

The margin of sampling error for the full sample is +/- 3.1 percentage points.

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72% Believe Equality of Opportunity is a Fundamental American Principle, Equality of Outcome is Not

Seventy-two percent (72%) of voters agree that “equality of opportunity is a fundamental American principle; equality of outcome is not.” Thirteen percent (13%) disagree and 16% are not sure.

Those totals include 36% who Strongly Agree and 4% who Strongly Disagree.

Seventy-six percent (76%) of White voters agree that freedom of opportunity is a fundamental American principle. So do 63% of Hispanic voters and 58% of Black voters.

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Note: Neither Scott Rasmussen, ScottRasmussen.com, nor RMG Research, Inc. have any affiliation with Rasmussen Reports. While Scott Rasmussen founded that firm, he left more than seven years ago and has had no involvement since that time.

Methodology

The survey of 1,200 Registered Voters was conducted online by Scott Rasmussen on September 30-October 2, 2021. Field work for the survey was conducted by RMG Research, Inc. Certain quotas were applied, and the sample was lightly weighted by geography, gender, age, race, education, internet usage, and political party to reasonably reflect the nation’s population of Registered Voters. Other variables were reviewed to ensure that the final sample is representative of that population.

The margin of sampling error for the full sample is +/- 2.8 percentage points.

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52% Say It’s Appropriate to Celebrate Columbus Day

Fifty-two percent (52%) of voters believe it is appropriate for the nation to celebrate Columbus Day. A Scott Rasmussen survey found that 28% disagree and 19% are not sure.

Thirty-three percent (33%) believe the holiday should be changed to Indigenous Peoples’ Day. Forty-five percent (45%) disagree and 22% are not sure.

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Note: Neither Scott Rasmussen, ScottRasmussen.com, nor RMG Research, Inc. have any affiliation with Rasmussen Reports. While Scott Rasmussen founded that firm, he left more than seven years ago and has had no involvement since that time.

Methodology

The survey of 1,000 Registered Voters was conducted online by Scott Rasmussen on October 9-10, 2021. Field work for the survey was conducted by RMG Research, Inc. Certain quotas were applied, and the sample was lightly weighted by geography, gender, age, race, education, internet usage, and political party to reasonably reflect the nation’s population of Registered Voters. Other variables were reviewed to ensure that the final sample is representative of that population.

The margin of sampling error for the full sample is +/- 3.1 percentage points.

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69% Want Students Taught That America Was Founded on Ideals of Freedom, Equality, and Self-Governance

Sixty-nine percent (69%) of voters believe students should be taught that “America was founded on the ideals of freedom, equality, and self-governance. Our nation has a tragic history of racial injustice, but we have made and continue to make progress.”

A Scott Rasmussen national survey found that 18% disagree and believe students should be taught that “America was founded on the ideas of racial oppression and white supremacy. We must recognize that the founders of our nation were racist and reject the system of government they created.” Thirteen percent (13%) are not sure which is more appropriate.

Seventy-six percent (76%) of Hispanic voters believe the nation was founded upon the noble ideals of freedom, equality, and self-governance. Seventy-four percent (74%) of White voters agree.

However, among Black voters, a modest plurality (42%) believe students should be taught that the nation was found upon racial oppression and white supremacy. Thirty-six percent (36%) of Black voters support teaching that America was founded on more noble ideals. Given the nation’s history, that result is far from surprising.

The survey also revealed public confusion over the term “Critical Race Theory.” Among those who have a Very Favorable opinion of Critical Race Theory, 62% believe students should be taught that “America was founded on the ideals of freedom, equality, and self-governance.” That conflicts with what many see as the political definition of Critical Race Theory.

Data released earlier showed that 93% of voters recognize that racism has played a major role in American history. That’s consistent with the question in this survey acknowledging that our nation has a tragic history of racial injustice.

Other data showed that 62% believe the US offers more freedom & equality than most Nations. That’s consistent with the question in this survey recognizing the history of racism, but also that we have made and continue to make progress. Seventy percent (70%) believe that the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s moved America closer to living out its founding ideals.

In raw political terms, voters strongly prefer a candidate supporting freedom & equality over one promising social justice and equity.

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Note: Neither Scott Rasmussen, ScottRasmussen.com, nor RMG Research, Inc. have any affiliation with Rasmussen Reports. While Scott Rasmussen founded that firm, he left more than seven years ago and has had no involvement since that time.

Methodology

The survey of 1,000 Registered Voters was conducted by Scott Rasmussen using a mixed mode approach from July 29-31, 2021. Field work for the survey was conducted by RMG Research, Inc. Most respondents were contacted online or via text while 231 were contacted using automated phone polling techniques. Online respondents were selected from a list of Registered Voters and through a process of Random Digital Engagement. Certain quotas were applied, and the sample was lightly weighted by geography, gender, age, race, education, internet usage, and political party to reasonably reflect the nation’s population of Registered Voters. Other variables were reviewed to ensure that the final sample is representative of that population.

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93% Recognize Racism As Big Part of American History; 20% Want to Scrap the Founding Ideals And Start Over

Ninety-three percent (93%) of voters nationwide recognize that racism has played a major role in America’s history. A Scott Rasmussen national survey found that total includes 49% who say America is a racist nation; 22% who believe there is still too much racial discrimination, but we’re making a lot of progress; and 22% who believe racial discrimination used to be a big issue, but it’s pretty much faded away.

The survey also found, however, that just 20% believe we should recognize that America was founded on racism and start over with something new.

Three times as many (63%) see racism as an issue, but aren’t ready to remake our political system. That includes 44% who believe it’s a declining part of our history and 19% who believe America is racist but the best path forward is helping the nation live up to its founding ideals.

Ten percent (10%) believe America is a racist nation but aren’t sure what to do about it. Eight percent (8%) believe America never had a significant amount of racial discrimination

Among those who do not describe the nation as racist, the overwhelming majority (84%) recognize that racial discrimination has played a significant role in American history. That includes 42% who believe there is still too much racial discrimination, but we’re making a lot of progress and 42% who believe racial discrimination used to be a big issue, but it’s pretty much faded away.

An earlier survey found that 8% of voters nationwide say most of their friends are racist. At the other end of the spectrum, a plurality (46%) of voters say none of their friends are racist. That total includes 59% of Republicans, 44% of Independents, and 35% of Democrats.

Thirty-eight percent (38%) of Hispanic voters and 34% and Black voters (34%) say we should recognize that America was founded on racism and start over with something new. In both cases, however, a larger number reject the idea of remaking our political system. Fifty-two percent (52%) of Hispanic voters reject the idea of remaking our political system. So do 42% of Black voters.

Among Very Liberal voters, who are evenly divided: 44% want to start over with something new while 46% reject that idea.

While racial and ethnic demographics are important to consider, it’s also important to recognize that our society is not neatly divided into easy to define racial categories. Richard Alba, a Distinguished Professor of Sociology at the Graduate Center, City University of New York, has pointed out “a robust development that is largely unheralded: a surge in the number of young Americans who come from mixed majority-minority families.” They “have one white parent and one nonwhite or Hispanic parent.”

Alba lays out his case in an important new book: “The Great Demographic Illusion: Majority, Minority, and the Expanding American Mainstream.”

A recent Scott Rasmussen survey found that 17% of voters claim at least two racial and ethnic backgrounds in their family history. It’s also significant to note that Hispanic voters whose parents were born in the United States have views that are much different than Hispanic voters who were born elsewhere.

The complexity of America’s racial and ethnic heritage suggests that the story of America is a nation with an expanding and ever more inclusive mainstream. That mainstream is guided by a shared desire to have the United States draw closer to living out its founding ideals of freedom, equality and self-governance.

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Note: Neither Scott Rasmussen, ScottRasmussen.com, nor RMG Research, Inc. have any affiliation with Rasmussen Reports. While Scott Rasmussen founded that firm, he left more than seven years ago and has had no involvement since that time.

Methodology

The online survey of 1,000 Registered Voters was conducted by Scott Rasmussen from May 13-15, 2021. Field work for the survey was conducted by RMG Research, Inc. Respondents were selected from a list of Registered Voters and through a process of Random Digital Engagement. Certain quotas were applied, and the sample was lightly weighted by geography, gender, age, race, education, internet usage, and political party to reasonably reflect the nation’s population of Registered Voters. Other variables were reviewed to ensure that the final sample is representative of that population.

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46% Believe America Is A Racist Nation

Forty-six percent (46%) of voters nationwide believe that America is a racist nation. A Scott Rasmussen national survey found that 40% disagree and 14% are not sure.

  • Sixty-eight percent (68%) of Democrats believe our nation is racist while 62% of Republicans say it is not.
  • Independent voters are evenly divided.
  • Most voters under 45 believe America is a racist nation while most over 55 say it is not.

The survey also found that 8% of voters nationwide say most of their friends are racist. Five percent (5%) of White voters say most of their friends are racist. Six percent (6%) of Black voters say the same. Among Hispanic voters, 22% say most of their friends are racist.

At the other end of the spectrum, a plurality (46%) of voters say none of their friends are racist. That total includes 59% of Republicans, 44% of Independents, and 35% of Democrats.

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Note: Neither Scott Rasmussen, ScottRasmussen.com, nor RMG Research, Inc. have any affiliation with Rasmussen Reports. While Scott Rasmussen founded that firm, he left more than seven years ago and has had no involvement since that time.

Methodology

The online survey of 1,000 Registered Voters was conducted by Scott Rasmussen from May 6-8, 2021. Field work for the survey was conducted by RMG Research, Inc. Respondents were selected from a list of Registered Voters and through a process of Random Digital Engagement. Certain quotas were applied, and the sample was lightly weighted by geography, gender, age, race, education, internet usage, and political party to reasonably reflect the nation’s population of Registered Voters. Other variables were reviewed to ensure that the final sample is representative of that population.

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34% Believe Federal Government Supports Founding Ideals of Freedom, Equality, Self-governance

Thirty-four percent (34%) of voters believe the federal government today supports America’s founding ideals of freedom, equality, and self-governance. A Scott Rasmussen national survey found that 43% believe the federal government does not support these ideals and 23% are not sure.

Fifty-seven percent (57%) of Republicans and 49% of Independents believe the federal government is not committed to supporting freedom, equality, and self-governance. However, 55% of Democrats believe the federal government does support them.

Other data from the survey found that 83% of voters believe the nation’s founding ideals are worth fighting for. However, just 53% believe most Americans support those ideals.

Data released earlies showed that 59% believe the federal government is a special interest group that looks out primarily for its own interests.

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Note: Neither Scott Rasmussen, ScottRasmussen.com, nor RMG Research, Inc. have any affiliation with Rasmussen Reports. While Scott Rasmussen founded that firm, he left more than seven years ago and has had no involvement since that time.

Methodology

The survey of 1,000 Registered Voters was conducted online by from March 17-18, 2021. Field work for the survey was conducted by RMG Research, Inc. Certain quotas were applied to the overall sample and lightly weighted by geography, gender, age, race, education, and political party to reasonably reflect the nation’s population. Other variables were reviewed to ensure that the final sample is representative of that population.

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65% Believe America Is Still Land of Opportunity

Sixty-five percent (65%) of voters believe America is still the land of opportunity. A Scott Rasmussen national survey found that 18% disagree and 17% are not sure.

There is a significant gender gap on this question. Seventy-four percent (74%) of men see the nation as a land of opportunity. Fifty-seven percent (57%) of women share that view.

There is, however, no significant difference across racial and ethnic lines. Sixty-eight percent (68%) of Hispanic voters believe the land of opportunity label still applies. So do 65% of White voters and 62% of Black voters.

Seventy percent (70%) of private sector workers say the U.S. is still a land of opportunity. So do 58% of government employees.

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Note: Neither Scott Rasmussen, ScottRasmussen.com, nor RMG Research, Inc. have any affiliation with Rasmussen Reports. While Scott Rasmussen founded that firm, he left more than seven years ago and has had no involvement since that time.

Methodology

The survey of 1,000 Registered Voters was conducted online by from March 17-18, 2021. Field work for the survey was conducted by RMG Research, Inc. Certain quotas were applied to the overall sample and lightly weighted by geography, gender, age, race, education, and political party to reasonably reflect the nation’s population. Other variables were reviewed to ensure that the final sample is representative of that population.

 

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68% Believe US Provides Citizens With More Freedom Than Any Other Nation

Sixty-eight percent (68%) of voters believe the United States provides its citizens with more freedom than just about any other major nation. A Scott Rasmussen national survey found that 19% disagree and 13% are not sure.

There is a massive generation gap on this question. Senior citizens, by an 80% to 7% margin believe the U.S. does provide more freedom than other nations. However, the youngest voters–those 18-24– are evenly divided. Just 44% of them believe the U.S. offers more freedom while 39% say it’s not true.

A majority of every other measured demographic group believes the U.S. offers its citizens more freedom than other nations.

The survey also found that 83% believe it is Very Important to protect the freedoms and rights of individual Americans.

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Note: Neither Scott Rasmussen, ScottRasmussen.com, nor RMG Research, Inc. have any affiliation with Rasmussen Reports. While Scott Rasmussen founded that firm, he left more than seven years ago and has had no involvement since that time.

Methodology

The survey of 1,200 Registered Voters was conducted by Scott Rasmussen from January 17-19, 2021. Field work for the survey was conducted by RMG Research, Inc. Respondents were contacted online through a process of Random Digital Engagement. Certain quotas were applied, and the sample was lightly weighted by geography, gender, age, race, education, and political party to reasonably reflect the nation’s population of Registered Voters. Other variables were reviewed to ensure that the final sample is representative of that population.

30% Favor Socialism, But Not The Way It Is Historically Understood

Thirty percent (30%) of voters nationwide have a favorable opinion of Socialism. A Scott Rasmussen national survey found that 47% hold an unfavorable view and 23% are not sure.

Those figures include 9% with a Very Favorable opinion of Socialism and 33% with a Very Unfavorable opinion.

However, most who say they like Socialism do not think of the term as it has been historically understood.

Among those with a favorable opinion of the term, just 37% believe it “is a system with higher taxes and extensive control of the economy by a centralized government.”

Only 10% of voters have a favorable opinion of Socialism AND view it as a centralized economic system.

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Methodology

The survey of 1,200 Registered Voters was conducted by Scott Rasmussen using a mixed mode approach from September 10-12, 2020. Field work for the survey was conducted by RMG Research, Inc. Most respondents were contacted online or via text while 166 were contacted using automated phone polling techniques. Certain quotas were applied to the overall sample and lightly weighted by geography, gender, age, race, education, and political party to reasonably reflect the nation’s population of Registered Voters. Other variables were reviewed to ensure that the final sample is representative of that population.

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America’s Founding Ideals Can Bring Americans Together

When 2020 began, no one could have predicted the enormous changes that would sweep through our nation and the world. It’s hard to find new ways the world turned upside down impact of the coronavirus pandemic, lockdowns, and the resulting economic disruption. As if that wasn’t enough, the nation also had to deal with the killing of George Floyd, peaceful protests against racial injustice, and riots plaguing American cities.

These events have made the presidential election campaign even more polarizing than usual. It sometimes seems as if there’s nothing Americans can agree upon.

However, a survey I conducted this past weekend showed that there is something 93% of American voters can agree upon—they believe it is important for our leaders to focus on things that bring people together. That total includes 71% who say it’s Very Important.

Ninety-six percent (96%) of Democrats believe it’s important to focus on bringing people together. So do 92% of Republicans and 90% of Independent voters.

Of course, in the political world, when partisan activists say they want unity, what they really want is for their opponents to agree with them. However, among voters throughout the nation, there’s also strong agreement on a starting point for creating that unity. Seventy-three percent (73%) of voters believe that America’s founding ideals of freedom, equality, and self-governance are a good foundation for bringing people together and unifying the nation. Just 12% disagree.

As you would expect with numbers like that, support for the founding ideals is found in all segments of our society. Among voters 55 and older, more than eight-out-of-ten see those ideals as a good foundation. So do two-thirds of younger voters. The idea that these ideals represent a path to unity is strongly supported by White and non-White voters; Suburban, Urban, and Rural Voters; conservatives, moderates, and liberals; college graduates and those without a degree.

Obviously, support for the founding ideals does not mean we have to agree on everything. There’s plenty of room for disagreement between candidates, parties, and voters. In fact, my weekend survey found that there is plenty of disagreement on a number of questions—including a question about the best approach to bringing people together.

When asked which would do more to bring people together, 48% said giving people more individual freedom to establish their own guidelines for social interaction. That’s a fairly traditional American answer. However, 34% took the opposite view and said a better approach to bringing people together would be more government involvement to establish fair rules and guidelines for social interaction.

This question revealed some stark divides in our society. Most voters over 45 said more freedom would be the best way to bring people together. Younger voters were evenly divided.

Republicans overwhelmingly believe more freedom is the better approach and, by a 47% to 29% margin, Independents agree. However, a narrow plurality of Democrats leans in the opposite direction. By a 44% to 38% margin, they believe giving government more power to establish fair rules would bring people together.

I’m sure there are some conservatives who will say that Democrats can’t possibly believe in freedom if they believe giving government more power will bring people together. And I’m also sure there are some liberals who will say that Republicans can’t possibly believe in equality if they don’t want to establish a fair set of rules.

But before we get too caught up in the things we disagree about, let’s first pause to celebrate the things we agree upon. America’s founding ideals—freedom, equality, and self-governance—are worth striving for and celebrating. They are the heritage and purpose we share as a nation. Celebrating those ideals and our commitment to them is the only way to bring Americans together.

40 Years Since the Last Meaningful Convention

This week, political junkies and activists will obsess over every detail of the Democratic National Convention. Next week, they’ll do the same about the Republican gathering. They’ll rate the speeches, watch for mistakes by the other team, and try to gauge the impact on the fall campaign. It’s likely that some campaign commercials will be cut from the gatherings and some new “rising stars” will be “discovered.”

But, barring any major gaffes, the events will have no impact on the election. That’s because most voters are not interested and will not be tuning in. Many may be only vaguely aware that the events are even taking place.

It used to be different. In the 1960s and ‘70s, there were only three television networks and they all covered the conventions as a big deal. Anybody turning on the TV would have noticed. In today’s world, consumers have a virtually unlimited supply of more appealing options on their screens and phones.

There’s more to the story, though, than that people have more options to watch. Conventions used to matter, they used to actually select presidential nominees. But that’s not the case anymore. It hasn’t been for a long, long time.

The last meaningful convention moment was 40 years ago. In 1980, Senator Ted Kennedy was challenging incumbent President Jimmy Carter for the Democratic nomination. Carter had won enough delegates to secure the nomination, but Kennedy was convinced that—in their hearts–most delegates preferred him. So, his team challenged the convention rules and called for a vote that would free all the delegates to vote their conscience.

Eventually, Carter’s team carried the day and the president was formally nominated. He went on to lose the general election to Ronald Reagan.

That 1980 convention capped a decade of change in the way we nominate our presidents, a change that made the conventions functionally irrelevant. We didn’t know it at the time, but the new nomination process would make conventions irrelevant.

From early in the 19th century until 1968, few delegates were selected in primaries and pledged to a specific candidate. Party officials typically served as delegates and openly haggled about the nominee. In 1968, only 13 states held primaries to select delegates.

Eugene McCarthy, running on an anti-War platform won most of the early primaries. Bobby Kennedy entered the race late and became a leading contender. However, he was assassinated just hours after winning the California primary.

Eventually, Vice President Hubert Humphrey won the nomination even though he had not entered a single primary. Everything about the convention that year was a disaster for the party. Several states sent competing slates of delegates. There were fights about the Vietnam War and Civil Rights issues. There were also riots in the streets playing out on television sets all across America.

After Humphrey lost to Richard Nixon, the Democrats decided to change their nominating process. George McGovern was put in charge of a commission to recommend new rules. And, perhaps not coincidentally, he became the Democratic nominee four years later.

One unintended result of the reform was that primaries quickly became the norm with potential delegates pledged to a particular candidate. Nobody understood it at the time, but with primary voters selecting the nominee directly, there would no longer be a need for nominating conventions. For a while, they served as televised pageants (funded by the taxpayers). But even that role has faded into history.

This year, the conventions will simply be virtual events. Maybe they will bring about another change. It might be too much to hope for, but maybe the pandemic could finally bring an end to this archaic charade.

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34% Believe U.S. One of the Best Countries in the World for Black People; 22% Say One of the Worst

Thirty-four percent (34%) of voters nationwide believe that the United States is one of the best places in the world for Black people to live. A Scott Rasmussen national survey found that 22% believe it is one of the worst.

Sixty percent (60%) believe the U.S. is one of the best places in the world for White people to live while 6% say it’s one of the worst.

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Methodology

The survey of 1,200 Registered Voters was conducted by Scott Rasmussen using a mixed mode approach from July 9-11, 2020. Field work for the survey was conducted by RMG Research, Inc. Most respondents were contacted online or via text while 117 were contacted using automated phone polling techniques. Certain quotas were applied, and the final sample was lightly weighted by geography, gender, age, race, education, and political party to reasonably reflect the nation’s population of Registered Voters. Other variables were reviewed to ensure that the final sample is representative of that population.

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On Equality, 52% Say U.S. Doing Well; 46% Disagree

Eighty-six percent (86%) of voters believe that Equality is a Very Important ideal for the United States to seek. A Scott Rasmussen national survey found that another 10% consider it Somewhat Important. The survey also found that 83% consider Freedom Very Important (along with another 15%) who say it is a Somewhat Important ideal.

While recognizing the importance of those ideals, voters give the nation mixed marks for the way we’re living up to them. On equality, 52% say we’re doing at least Somewhat Well while 46% disagree. On Freedom, 63% believe we’re doing at least Somewhat Well while 35% disagree.

Seventy-nine percent (79%) of Republicans believe the nation is doing okay when it comes to equality. Just 47% or Independents and 33% of Democrats agree. As on many issues, there is an interesting difference between the opinions of White Democrats and Non-white Democrats.  Just 28% of White Democrats think the nation is doing at least Somewhat Well in terms of living up to the ideal of equality. However, Non-white Democrats are a bit more upbeat, 40% think the nation is doing okay.

Data released earlier showed that 74% of voters nationwide believe that “In daily life, most Americans generally get along regardless of race. They find ways to work together and create a better community.

The survey also found that 75% believe Community is a Very Important ideal and 48% say the same about Self-Governance.

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Methodology

The survey of 1,200 Registered Voters was conducted by Scott Rasmussen using a mixed mode approach from July 9-11, 2020. Field work for the survey was conducted by RMG Research, Inc. Most respondents were contacted online or via text while 117 were contacted using automated phone polling techniques. Certain quotas were applied, and the final sample was lightly weighted by geography, gender, age, race, education, and political party to reasonably reflect the nation’s population of Registered Voters. Other variables were reviewed to ensure that the final sample is representative of that population.

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78% Proud to Be An American; 62% Proud of Our History

Seventy-eight percent (78%) of voters nationwide are proud to be an American. A Scott Rasmussen national survey also found that 62% are proud of our nation’s history.

Other findings from the survey show that 52% consider themselves Very Patriotic and another 28% are Somewhat Patriotic. Older voters are more patriotic. In fact, by a 47% to 42% margin, voters aged 18-24 say they’re not patriotic.

Additionally, 48% believe the United States is a good role model for the world to follow while 35% disagree and 17% are not sure. A majority of White voters (52%) believe the U.S. is a good role model while a majority of Black voters (54%) disagree. Hispanic and other voters are evenly divided.

There are significant partisan, racial and generational differences on these topics.

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Methodology

The survey of 1,200 Registered Voters was conducted by Scott Rasmussen using a mixed mode approach from July 9-11, 2020. Field work for the survey was conducted by RMG Research, Inc. Most respondents were contacted online or via text while 117 were contacted using automated phone polling techniques. Certain quotas were applied, and the final sample was lightly weighted by geography, gender, age, race, education, and political party to reasonably reflect the nation’s population of Registered Voters. Other variables were reviewed to ensure that the final sample is representative of that population.

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Most Who Strongly Disapprove of Trump Also Oppose Removing Statues Honoring Washington

Among those who Strongly Disapprove of President Trump, 57% also disapprove of removing statues that honor George Washington. Those findings come from an analysis of a JustTheNews.com national opinion survey conducted by Scott Rasmussen.

These results help explain why House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and presumptive Democratic Presidential nominee Joe Biden publicly opposed efforts to remove statues honoring early presidents who were also slave-owners. Both had earlier expressed support for taking down statues honoring honoring Confederate soldiers. Pelosi said the issue was not about slaveholding, but loyalty to the United States: “I do believe that if people have committed treason against the United States of America their statue should not be in the Capitol.”

Politically, as the party out of power, Democrats are hoping to draw support and energy from those who Strongly Disapprove of President Trump’s performance. However, that message could be complicated if those who most oppose the president come to see the Democrats embracing a policy of removing statues honoring George Washington and other early presidents. This represents significant block of voters. Seventeen percent (17%) of all voters Strongly Disapprove of President Trump and also Strongly Oppose efforts to take down statues honoring George Washington.

Overall, among all voters, the survey found that 24% favor removing the Washington statues while 65% are opposed.

Voters nationwide are evenly divided about removing statues honoring Confederate soldiers. There is a strong alignment between those who disapprove of the president and those who support removing statues honoring those who rebelled against the United States.

The JustTheNews.com survey found plurality support for removing statues honoring just one historical figure–Karl Marx.

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America may not be the same after coronavirus. That may be a good thing

NOTE: This column was originally published in the Deseret News.

Last week, I began to explore what life will be like when the coronavirus lockdown finally ends.

Initially, people will crave a return to in-person social gatherings and some sense of normalcy. Still, when the stay-at-home orders and mandatory business closings are lifted, the reopening of society will proceed cautiously. Guided by a mix of joy and fear, some people will jump right back into old routines while others will take it more slowly. Many, without consciously thinking about it, will never again attend events with huge crowds or ride a crowded subway.

Some businesses will open their doors and offices faster than others. Sadly, many will never reopen. Returning workers will learn new routines and procedures to ensure a safe and healthy work environment, especially for businesses that deal directly with consumers.

Politicians will debate what sort of international trade and travel restrictions might be appropriate going forward. What kind of security can protect against an invisible virus? Should the new restrictions apply only to China? Or to all nations? It will soon become clear that the pandemic has reset discussions on just about every political issue.

Still, it won’t be long before a new normal sets in. Our culture and lifestyle adapt so quickly to new realities that we soon forget what came before. If you doubt that’s true, consider the phrase social distancing. A month or so ago, hardly anybody had heard of it. Now it’s a part of daily conversation.

These new routines will never replace in-person gatherings — humans need such contact for their physical and mental well-being. But, when the crisis is over, the new approaches will not wither away or disappear. Americans will not unlearn what they are learning today. Instead, they will use what they have learned in ways that will alter the frequency and purpose of our face-to-face encounters with others.

A friend of mine works with a large team that has been forced to telecommute during the current crisis. It’s going so well that he’s now thinking of working from Florida for a month next winter. Following the experience of the past month, he figures his boss will have no reason to object. My friend values the regular, in-person interactions with his co-workers and will have plenty of it for most of the year. But the month in Florida will also give him more time with family and friends in a pleasant setting.

Millions of Americans will do the same and seamlessly adopt what they’ve learned during the lockdown to make changes in their daily life. After a while, it won’t seem different at all. It will just be a new normal.

Though the novelty of our new routines will quickly wear off, the impact of those changes will bring about massive social disruption. To take just one example, when my friend and his team telecommute more regularly, their company will need less office space. That seemingly minor change will ripple through the economies of major cities.

  • For two centuries leading up to the 1970s, the trend was for everything in America to get bigger, more centralized and more homogenized.
  • After the ’70s, however, cultural trends moved in the opposite direction with everything becoming more niche-oriented, decentralized and personalized.

It is hard to overstate the significance of this cultural turnaround. “The devices and connectivity so essential to modern life put unprecedented p ower in the hands of every individual,” according to Harvard’s Nicco Mele. This is “a radical redistribution of power that our traditional institutions don’t and perhaps can’t understand.” As if that wasn’t enough, he adds, “Radical connectivity is toxic to traditional power structures.”

This decentralizing force has been transforming our society for decades. Many institutions and industries have already adapted or disappeared. Following the pandemic, the scale and pace of change will increase dramatically.

In the coming weeks, I’ll look at how our decentralizing culture is poised to bring about massive changes to our health care, education and political systems.

While transitions are always unsettling, we have reason to be optimistic about the future. That’s because this new era has put “unprecedented power in the hands of every individual.” That’s a good thing!

Taking power away from the few and giving it to the many is right in line with our nation’s founding ideals. From a pragmatic viewpoint, it means more people will have a greater ability to work together and create a better world.

Scott Rasmussen is an American political analyst and digital media entrepreneur. He is the author of “The Sun is Still Rising: Politics Has Failed But America Will Not.”