61% Want States to Set Minimum Wage, 30% Favor National Standard

Sixty-one percent (61%) of voters nationwide believe states establish the appropriate minimum wage so that places like New York City have a higher minimum wage than places like rural Idaho. A Scott Rasmussen national survey found that 30% take the opposite view and want the federal government to establish a standard minimum wage that is the same everywhere in the country.

Support for letting states determine the minimum wage comes from 67% of Rural voters, 61% in the Suburbs, and 57% in Urban areas.

On a partisan basis, most Republicans (74%) and Independents (65%) think the states should set standards appropriate for their area. Democrats are evenly divided: 48% want a nationally standard minimum wage while 48% believe the states should decide.

Fifty-seven percent (57%) of Very Liberal voters favor a national standard. That is the only measured demographic group showing majority support for having the federal government set the standard.

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Note: Neither Scott Rasmussen, ScottRasmussen.com, nor RMG Research, Inc. have any affiliation with Rasmussen Reports. While Scott Rasmussen founded that firm, he left more than seven years ago and has had no involvement since that time.

Methodology

The survey of 1,200 Registered Voters was conducted by Scott Rasmussen using a mixed mode approach from February 18-20, 2021. Field work for the survey was conducted by RMG Research, Inc. Most respondents were contacted online or via text while 212 were contacted using automated phone polling techniques. Online respondents were selected from a list of Registered Voters and through a process of Random Digital Engagement. Certain quotas were applied, and the sample was lightly weighted by geography, gender, age, race, education, and political party to reasonably reflect the nation’s population of Registered Voters. Other variables were reviewed to ensure that the final sample is representative of that population.